Five Nights at Freddy’s 2 Gets 2025 Release Date, M3GAN 2.0 Moves Back One Month – IGN


Universal and Blumhouse have set a release date for Five Nights at Freddy’s 2 that will bring the animatronic horror sequel to theaters on December 5, 2025, per Variety.

The calendar update also brings new dates for a handful of other Blumhouse titles. M3GAN 2.0 is now premiering one month later than planned, moving from May 16, 2025, to June 27, 2025. The Black Phone 2 was hit with a more significant delay and will now arrive October 17, 2025, instead of its June 27, 2025 date.

FIVE NIGHTS AT FREDDY'S 2 JOINS BLUMHOUSE'S STACKED 2025 SLATE. IMAGE COURTESY OF BLUMHOUSE.
FIVE NIGHTS AT FREDDY’S 2 JOINS BLUMHOUSE’S STACKED 2025 SLATE. IMAGE COURTESY OF BLUMHOUSE.

The Woman in the Yard and Drop were both added to Blumhouse’s release schedule, too. Expect to see the former come to audiences on March 28, 2025, with the latter set to land on April 11, 2025. Today’s calendar update puts Blumhouse releases in March, April, June, October, and December, giving the studio a stacked set of offerings throughout the year.

Five Nights at Freddy’s 2 is probably its most anticipated release coming in the near future. After bringing the hit indie horror game to the big screen last year, Blumhouse announced that the film managed to be its biggest movie opening of all time. A sequel was unsurprisingly announced in April and originally promised a fall 2025 release.

The December date means Five Nights at Freddy’s 2 will be out slightly later than expected. This is also M3GAN 2.0’s second delay, as its original date was previously set for January 17 of next year. Story details for Blumhouse’s 2025 slate largely remain a mystery, but we might have at least a few clues regarding what’s in store for Freddy Fazbear.

For more on Blumhouse, you can read our Five Nights at Freddy’s review. We didn’t enjoy the film quite as much as others did, giving it a 4/10 in our review. At the time, we said, “This big-screen take on the indie-horror sensation has too much plot and not enough of the game’s primal security-cam thrills.”

Michael Cripe is a freelance contributor with IGN. He started writing in the industry in 2017 and is best known for his work at outlets such as The Pitch, The Escapist, OnlySP, and Gameranx.

Be sure to give him a follow on Twitter @MikeCripe.



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